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  • Angélique Voiceover

Updated: Aug 22


So you're a voiceover artist?
So you're a voiceover artist?

So you're a voiceover artist?


A question I no longer mind being asked, but one with an answer that always comes with an elaboration. Voiceover? Sounds interesting they say but what the hell do you actually do...


Funnily enough, now that I don't care what people might think about what I do, I very rarely get asked. It comes with getting older (as in older than 35 basically..!). NO one really cares what people do for a living, they're too busy with their lives, and much ego has been put aside (very wise), and anyway, so many jobs nowadays are impossible to understand, right. Somee job titles have become so complicated, at times inflated, or confusing - "Healthcare team foot health gain facilitator" anyone? On that note, though voiceover artist is the job title of what I do, I'm never fully comfortable saying I'm a VoiceOver artist. The artist part. Am I an artist? Well, I'm creative and sensitive, and I quickly understand a text and how to give it life and which emotions to tap into. A good voiceover will always elevate the project. And by 'good' I mean professional, experienced, talented, and most importantly, authentic.


And at times the result is so beautiful you never forget it, and it touches you. So yes, it can be art. For example, my current favourite is 'Volvo. Sponsors Sky Atlantic" It's superb and perfect to my ears. Four words. Four words that make you not forget and leave you wanting more. I think that is a perfect execution. That voice. Magnifique.


I mean have you heard the Volvo advert? The one that says “Volvo. Sponsors Sky Atlantic.” It’s beautiful. Every time I hear it I think aaah, wow, mmmh. The voice, the tone, the pace. Absolutely perfect.


Some people say how hard can it be to just read words. Well, amigo, I see what you mean, but really, dig deeper, it's more complicated than that. How hard is it be to be good at it? Well, I don't know, but it sure is easy to be bad.


Everything looks easy even when mastered.


Ok, back on track. What do you do, what do you do? I do voice overs, I record voice overs, I lend my voice to a variety of texts. I work in the voiceover industry, I’m a VoiceOver artist!

Most of my work is recording for adverts, corporate/explainer videos, promos, e-learning courses, dubbing and ADR sessions.


What have you most likely heard me in? Well... maybe some training videos but the most known advert I ever lent my voice to was for The New Renault Clio a few years ago. It was in UK cinemas and radio for a year. And, no, not the Nicole Papa one! That was brilliant, but waaaaay before my time as they say. 1996-2000 to be exact


Here are some of the last jobs I recorded recently: an online film called 'Free The Butterflies' about human trafficking for Facebook, lines for an App for Nike that suggests to people what kind of work out they could do depending on their mood, an e-learning course for Lean 6 Sigma ( it's team-focused managerial approach to improve performance), the tagline for a Chinese fashion house called Fabrique (@fabrique.official), a BBC promo for a new French drama called 'BBC Paris Police 1900', a training video for a new medical treatment for oesteroposis, dubbing of several characters for a few Amercian Netflix documentaries (I do, Re-do, Connected, (Un)Well), online safety videos for Vistara airline company, and an avert for a washing powder called Persil/Skip.


It's taken 15 years to get to where I am (as in working regularly and it now being my full time profession). I used to work in film production full time for 12 years and voiceover was my side gig. More on that in another blog. One about professional identity...


I record in both French and English, pretty much 50/50. I have lived in England for a long time and my command of English is strong. It's all up to the ear, some people say I have a strong French accent, some say I don't. No one knows basically, it's an opinion, but you just amp it or tone it down to suit the job at hand. In any case, I have a neutral French accent in French, and my natural speaking voice in English has a mild French accent. I sometimes get hired for what’s called a Euro-neutral accent as well. It's for when you have to sound broadly European in English.


I've been represented by the main London voiceover agencies for 10-15 years. I got to be on their books at the right time. There is triple the competition now. Up to 5 years ago, all the voiceover work I did was thanks to and through my agents. I set up my recording space at home 5 years ago and I've been able to build some direct clients on top. So I work both from home and West End studios. I absolutely love going to the studios and just have worry about delivering the best voiceover I can. But equally having the freedom to work from home is amazing, especially when you have a little child. Three days after I gave birth 2 years ago, I recorded a 2 hour voiceover for a regular client of mine. The baby was sleeping being watched by her daddy and I got to work, then walked down the stairs, and held my baby again. I never forget this privilege, that is having a job that allows me to spend a lot of time with my child.

One I worked hard towards, but a privilege nonetheless.


À bientôt les amis...



 

Highly experienced French-born voiceover artist who works in both French & English. I was the voice for the New Renault Clio in the UK & Boohoo in France for years. I am based in London but work with clients in France, USA, Canada and throughout the world. Find out more >

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